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USA Vs. Japan Results: United States Women Win Gold In Soccer

The United States women's soccer team took to the pitch in a rematch with Japan on Thursday afternoon in London in the gold medal match of the 2012 Summer Olympics. The United States got on the scoreboard early in the game with a goal from Carli Lloyd, who knocked in the goal after a pass from Alex Morgan. It looked like Morgan's initial target was Abby Wambach, who's scored a torrent of goals in the Olympics, but Lloyd swooped in for a header and the score giving the U.S. a 1-0 lead.

Even with the lead, Japan had the United States women's team on the ropes for much of the match as Japan constantly peppered America with shots on goal. Thanks to some defensive plays by captain Christie Rampone and some amazing saves by Hope Solo, the United States was able to hold off Japan for much of the first half of the match.

In the second half, Japan continued to press the United States and found themselves just shy of a few goals once again. The United States was able to pick up another goal and take a 2-0 lead however, thanks to a wonderful effort by Lloyd.

Lloyd took possession of the ball near midfield and worked her way to the box before knocking in a shot from the left side of the goal to the far side. The goal, Lloyd's second of the match, gave the United States a comfortable lead and ended up being just enough to hold on to win the gold medal.

Japan cut into the lead with a Yuki Ogimi goal late, but it wasn't enough as Hope Solo was able to fend of shot after shot as the United States avenged their World Cup loss.

For a complete schedule of events and dates medals will be awarded, visit NBC Sports' official Olympic website. For complete coverage from the 2012 London Olympics, keep checking this StoryStream and visit SB Nation's Olympics hub.

Photographs by cstreet.us, thelastminute, turtlemom nancy , fesek, kthypryn, justinwright, sue_elias, pointnshoot, and scrapstothefuture used in background montage under Creative Commons. Thank you.