clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Forbes Report: Rays Franchise Increases In Value

Two days ago, Forbes released their yearly financial report on baseball's most valuable teams. As always, the results are pretty intuitive: large market teams like the Yankees, Red Sox, Cubs, and Phillies are all at the top of the list, while small market teams such as the Rays, Pirates, and Royals fill out the bottom.

The gap between rich and poor teams becomes blatantly obvious with these rankings, as the large market teams can be worth as much as two to three times as much as the smaller market teams. And then there's the Yankees, who are simply operating in an entirely different stratosphere; their current value ($1.7 billion) is nearly twice as much as the next closest club (the Red Sox, $912 million), and their yearly revenue is well over double what teams like the Rays are pulling in. Sometimes, it really doesn't seem like they're playing the same game as the rest of the league.

There's some good news in this year's report about the Rays, as Forbes has their franchise value increasing by 5% from last season. Overall, the Rays have had their franchise value increase 88% since the new ownership took over (h/t Dock of the Rays), while their revenue streams have increased by around 50% over the same time period. While I'm sure the Rays would like those numbers to be larger, those are still overall encouraging trends. For people that claim the Rays are in danger of being contracted, these numbers should help alleviate those concerns.

Full chart after the jump.

Of course, these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. Forbes does not have any special access to the books of major league baseball teams, and so these figures are likely not 100% accurate (especially the revenue and operating income categories). At the same time, they're good references and considering how hard major league baseball teams deny these figures are accurate, you've got to figure they hit somewhat close to home.

Rank Team Current Value ($ mil) 1-year Value Change (%) Debt/Value (%) Revenue ($ mil) Operating Income ($ mil)
1 New York Yankees 1,700 6 4 427 25.7
2 Boston Red Sox 912 5 26 272 -1.1
3 Los Angeles Dodgers 800 10 54 246 32.8
4 Chicago Cubs 773 6 75 258 23.4
5 New York Mets 747 -13 60 233 -6.2
6 Philadelphia Phillies 609 13 29 239 8.9
7 San Francisco Giants 563 16 21 230 29.9
8 Texas Rangers 561 25 66 206 22.6
9 LA Angels of Anaheim 554 6 10 222 11.8
10 Chicago White Sox 526 13 8 210 27.6
11 St. Louis Cardinals 518 6 53 207 19.8
12 Minnesota Twins 490 21 20 213 26.5
13 Atlanta Braves 482 7 0 201 22.2
14 Houston Astros 474 5 12 197 14.4
15 Seattle Mariners 449 2 15 204 9.9
16 Washington Nationals 417 8 60 194 36.6
17 Colorado Rockies 414 8 19 188 16.3
18 Baltimore Orioles 411 9 37 175 25.5
19 San Diego Padres 406 0 49 159 37.2
20 Arizona Diamondbacks 396 4 25 180 6.2
21 Detroit Tigers 385 3 55 192 -29.1
22 Milwaukee Brewers 376 7 32 179 12.4
23 Cincinnati Reds 375 13 11 179 20.1
24 Florida Marlins 360 13 40 143 20.2
25 Cleveland Indians 353 -10 31 168 12.1
26 Kansas City Royals 351 3 14 160 10.3
27 Toronto Blue Jays 337 3 0 168 3.6
28 Tampa Bay Rays 331 5 35 166 6.8
29 Oakland Athletics 307 4 29 161 23.2
30 Pittsburgh Pirates 304 5 42 160 26.4

Photographs by cstreet.us, thelastminute, turtlemom nancy , fesek, kthypryn, justinwright, sue_elias, pointnshoot, and scrapstothefuture used in background montage under Creative Commons. Thank you.